By PJ Hollenbeck

The Leapfrog Aspect Android app has been available for more than a month on Google Play. Over 300 devices have installed the app, and use cases have ranged from general geology and mining visualization to civil tunneling projects and environmental studies.

The first update went out two weeks after release which added support for contour lines and planned drillholes, as well as a number of minor bugs.

 

File size limitations

Questions regarding File Size limitations have come up a lot, but unfortunately there’s not a great answer for a standard size limit.  Aspect has better success loading wireframes than drillholes and point data, so a file that’s 50MB but mostly wireframes is going to be more suitable for viewing in Aspect than a 20MB file consisting of 3000 drillholes.  High-resolution texture maps on surfaces (such as draped aerial photos on topography) will also slow down Aspect and may lead to crashes or other undesirable behavior. Likewise, if a scene is choppy or erratic on the desktop Viewer, it will probably have issues in Aspect. If there are errors in wireframes they may also cause issues in Aspect, so be sure to use clean data when exporting scenes!

 

Block models

Block models are not currently supported by Aspect, but to work around this limitation the blocks could be exported as points to a CSV file, then loaded back into Geo as points, which could then be visualized in Aspect.  Don’t forget to filter the points prior to building a scene for Aspect though – it won’t be able to display 1 million points, but can be really useful to see targeted blocks such as high-grade locations or those within a specific lithological boundary.

 

Use topography for better depth perception

It is always a good idea to include a current topographic surface in the scenes viewed in Aspect, as it can often be difficult to recognize where two objects situate in relation to each other due to the lack of depth perception in single-screen augmented reality.  The topography can provide a frame of reference for objects, thereby creating a pseudo-depth perception in the viewer window.

 

Zoom out with the field of view setting

A final tip provided by one of our users: if you need to “zoom out” a bit while looking at a scene but don’t want to physically move to do so, a good trick is to adjust the Field of View value in the Settings panel to a high value – this will give a fisheye lens effect to the data, which will in turn give an effect of zoning back and allowing more data to be visible in the viewer window. When finished, simply reset the Field of View value to return the data to its correct size and position.

Halswell Demo Data viewed using the “correct” Field of View setting.

The identical view of the Halswell data as the previous image, but with the Field of View set to the maximum 110 value - all of the objects appear farther away, and more of the peripheral data is now visible, giving a “zoomed-out” effect.  Notice, however, that the drillholes in particular are somewhat skewed and the view will not match a real world overlay.

The identical view of the Halswell data as the previous image, but with the Field of View set to the maximum 110 value – all of the objects appear farther away, and more of the peripheral data is now visible, giving a “zoomed-out” effect. Notice, however, that the drillholes in particular are somewhat skewed and the view will not match a real world overlay.