Category: Hints and tips

3D geological mapping: From 2D GIS maps to 3D modelling

By Antonio Celis

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Traditionally, geoscientists have translated their field data collection efforts into a digital version of a geological map, which is typically built using GIS software (e.g. ArcGIS). Consequently most companies will have large archives loaded with GIS information from their projects. With more companies now choosing to collect their field data using electronic devices it ultimately results in a large repository of GIS data.

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Leapfrog 4.0 – Unlocking the value of Structural Data

We’d like to share some of the feedback we’ve received so far from users who are benefiting from Leapfrog 4.0’s new structural modelling tools and workflows. We hope this blog gives you the opportunity to compare your experience with others, motivates you to dive into modelling your structural data yourself or just encourages you to experiment!’

Structural Geology

Leapfrog 4.0 is a major release that introduces an entirely new structural data workflow and tools to import and clean structural data, identify patterns and then incorporate this valuable structural knowledge into your models.

“ One thing I really like is the easy and intuitive nature of loading and choosing the data you want to work with.The speed at which you can get an overall trend-will help in determining the general shape of wireframes (it’s fast). “

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Leapfrog Aspect: Tips and tricks

By PJ Hollenbeck

The Leapfrog Aspect Android app has been available for more than a month on Google Play. Over 300 devices have installed the app, and use cases have ranged from general geology and mining visualization to civil tunneling projects and environmental studies.

The first update went out two weeks after release which added support for contour lines and planned drillholes, as well as a number of minor bugs.

 

File size limitations

Questions regarding File Size limitations have come up a lot, but unfortunately there’s not a great answer for a standard size limit.  Aspect has better success loading wireframes than drillholes and point data, so a file that’s 50MB but mostly wireframes is going to be more suitable for viewing in Aspect than a 20MB file consisting of 3000 drillholes.  High-resolution texture maps on surfaces (such as draped aerial photos on topography) will also slow down Aspect and may lead to crashes or other undesirable behavior. Likewise, if a scene is choppy or erratic on the desktop Viewer, it will probably have issues in Aspect. If there are errors in wireframes they may also cause issues in Aspect, so be sure to use clean data when exporting scenes!

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Leapfrog Central: What does it mean for your organisation?

By Peter Joynt

In 2003, ARANZ Geo released the first version of Leapfrog. Leapfrog’s implicit modelling engine brought about a paradigm shift in the way geologists generate 3D interpretations. Organisations that have embraced this new technology have realised significant benefits by building dynamic implicit models in less time.

Now, in 2016, we are releasing Leapfrog Central, a model management system that will bring about another paradigm shift, to continuous modelling.

What is continuous modelling? Continuous modelling supports incremental changes to models as data becomes available, and because the development of the model is visible to the wider organisation, decisions can be made based on the latest data and the most current understanding.

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Point selection in Leapfrog Geo 3.1

By Peter Joynt

As you may know, we have recently released Leapfrog Geo 3.1 – this new release adds 3D point selection, a relatively simple feature that unlocks a number of new workflows. I am going to show you a few of these workflows – and hopefully it helps identify others that will fit your unique problems.

The point selection tool works in a similar way to interval selection, which has been available in Geo for some time. Interval selection is extremely useful for reclassifying poorly logged intervals and picking vein and dyke segments out of large complex drillhole datasets in 3D. The workflow is based around a simple to use 3D paint brush tool which, when combined with in-scene slicing and query filters, lets you quickly select and re-classify segments. We have now adapted this tool to be used with points, and allowed the creation of new category selection columns on points. Below are three examples of ways point selection can be used in your projects.

 

Selection of collars

Have you ever worked with a large drillhole dataset that has multiple prospects but no column in the database that can be used to separate them? This is a situation where the point selection tool can be useful. You can easily select a subset of drillholes in 3D and assign them a category. On top of this, you can apply query filters to give you flexibility for modelling and visualisation. The selection itself can be carried out directly on the collar table in the Drillhole Data folder.

Collar selection

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Making the most of Leapfrog for flow modelling: Part 2

By Jason McIntosh

Continued from part 1 – Making the most of Leapfrog for Flow Modelling.

Generate and evaluate a finite element grid

Finally to generate a FEFLOW model right click ‘Flow Models’ in the project tree and select ‘New 2D FEFLOW Model’. Set the element size and boundary from either a GIS line, polyline or a GM. Next expand the grid, right click ‘grid’ and select ‘New feature’. Within the dialogue add any ‘Point’, ‘Line’ or ‘Polygon’ features you wish to refine the grid with. Select ‘Simplify Feature’ to reduce or increase the number of points used for the boundary prisms. Next double click the grid, in the ‘Features’ tab and activate any features you wish to build detail around and the number of refinement steps. Within the ‘Boundary’ tab select either a rectangular boundary or a custom boundary by selecting ‘From another object’.

2D FEFLOW grid with refined cells about the collar locations.

2D FEFLOW grid with refined cells about the collar locations.

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Making the most of Leapfrog for flow modelling: Part 1

By Jason McIntosh

Simulating fluid flow, mass and heat transfer requires the synthesis of geological models with a multitude of parameters, the process is complex. So how can Leapfrogs modelling functionality be used to streamline it? 

Interoperability with FEFLOW and MODFLOW allows Leapfrog Hydro, Geothermal and Hydrology module users to interpolate initial simulation parameters and apply them to geologically constrained finite element and finite difference grids. For the purpose of this blog I will demonstrate the capabilities by modelling an aquifer system in Leapfrog Geo, simulating it in FEFLOW and viewing the time series in Leapfrog.

Aquifer systems are comprised of permeable porous water bearing aquifers and impermeable aquitards. Both have variable permeability and porosity within the sedimentary units they are comprised of, the units themselves pinch-out and diverge within stratified layers of sediment. Stratified drift aquifers are among the most challenging of such systems, as a result of the complex depositional environments they derive from.

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Optimum performance with Leapfrog projects

By Tim Schurr

Have you noticed the “.aproj_data” folder that always appears along-side your Leapfrog project file?

 aproj_data-folder in Leapfrog Geo

If you’ve ever had to move or copy a project to another location, you’ve probably come across it, opened folder using explorer and discovered a whole raft of sub-folders and files and thought “What’s all of this?  Is this really my Leapfrog project?”

.aproj_data folder beside Leapfrog project

In this article, I will explain the reason why Leapfrog saves projects in seemingly such a bizarre way, then I’ll give you a couple of tricks on how to get the best performance and reliability out of your Leapfrog projects.

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Creating accurate vein systems from complex data

By Jason McIntosh

Modelling multiple thin intersecting veins in 3D can be an arduous task, luckily the Leapfrog vein modelling tool is perfect for visualising thin intersecting vein systems. Complex vein systems are common in many geological settings, but for the purpose of this blog I’m going to focus on shear zone vein systems. So bear with me as I attempt to sum up the characteristics of metalliferous shear zone ore deposits and how they can be modelled using Leapfrog Geo in an easily digestible blog.

A shear zone is a discontinuity surface in the Earth’s crust and upper mantle. Depending on the characteristics of the shear zone genesis and later regional tectonics, shear zones can form economic gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc and molybdenum deposits. However, the formation of large mineral deposits is dependent on a number of factors.

Shear zones form in brittle/ductile transition zones as metamorphic facies are uplifted during orogenic collisions. They are mineralized throughout successive cycles consisting of increased and decreased fluid pressure phases. Metamorphic compression pressurizes the fluid and seismic activity reduces the pressure by allowing the fluid to invade the country rock along grain boundaries and fractures. The successive cycles allow fluid to disperse and regenerate, therefore allowing for incremental precipitation of incompatible elements such as gold within fractures and along grain boundaries.

Characteristic veins within the Brittle-Ductile transition zone. (Image sourced from USGS).

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Building a geological model – Part 3 of 3

By Andrew Cantwell

Creating a first pass interpolant

This video continues on from part 2 of building a geological model in Leapfrog.

The process outlined in this video is simplified – the idea of this blog post is to give an understanding of the speed and ease of creating a first pass interpolant which can then be refined to give a more reasonable model.

You won’t hear any narration in this video but captions have been provided to explain the basic steps. If you’re after a more detailed description of the model building process then please contact your local support team.

We recommend you view this video in full screen mode. It may take approximately 30 seconds after you press play to switch to High Definition (given your internet connection allows it).

The main steps in this video include:

  • Viewing the assay data
  • Using some of the visualisation options to gain a basic understanding of the trend
  • Creating an interpolant model
  • Adjusting some basic parameters to get a more realistic model.

If you missed the previous videos in the model building series you can view Part 1 or Part 2 on this blog.

 

Further reading:
Case Study – can implicit modelling be used to model complex geology.

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