Category: Training

3D geological mapping: From 2D GIS maps to 3D modelling

By Antonio Celis

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Traditionally, geoscientists have translated their field data collection efforts into a digital version of a geological map, which is typically built using GIS software (e.g. ArcGIS). Consequently most companies will have large archives loaded with GIS information from their projects. With more companies now choosing to collect their field data using electronic devices it ultimately results in a large repository of GIS data.

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Leapfrog and the Integra Gold Rush Challenge

The 2015 Integra Gold Rush Challenge was a crowd-sourcing competition inviting participants to help uncover the next big gold discovery in Canada’s Val-d’Ors, Quebec. Crowdsourcing offers mining an alternative to traditional approaches as it harnesses the accumulated wisdom of a wide and diverse group of individuals.

Leapfrog was the official 3D modelling partner. With access to over six terabytes of digital mining and exploration data, it was a great opportunity to showcase our powerful FastRBF™ engine. Over 1,300 participants registered to use the free Leapfrog Gold Rush licences we provided, including all of the five finalists.

 
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Leapfrog Aspect: Tips and tricks

By PJ Hollenbeck

The Leapfrog Aspect Android app has been available for more than a month on Google Play. Over 300 devices have installed the app, and use cases have ranged from general geology and mining visualization to civil tunneling projects and environmental studies.

The first update went out two weeks after release which added support for contour lines and planned drillholes, as well as a number of minor bugs.

 

File size limitations

Questions regarding File Size limitations have come up a lot, but unfortunately there’s not a great answer for a standard size limit.  Aspect has better success loading wireframes than drillholes and point data, so a file that’s 50MB but mostly wireframes is going to be more suitable for viewing in Aspect than a 20MB file consisting of 3000 drillholes.  High-resolution texture maps on surfaces (such as draped aerial photos on topography) will also slow down Aspect and may lead to crashes or other undesirable behavior. Likewise, if a scene is choppy or erratic on the desktop Viewer, it will probably have issues in Aspect. If there are errors in wireframes they may also cause issues in Aspect, so be sure to use clean data when exporting scenes!

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Leapfrog Central: What does it mean for your organisation?

By Peter Joynt

In 2003, ARANZ Geo released the first version of Leapfrog. Leapfrog’s implicit modelling engine brought about a paradigm shift in the way geologists generate 3D interpretations. Organisations that have embraced this new technology have realised significant benefits by building dynamic implicit models in less time.

Now, in 2016, we are releasing Leapfrog Central, a model management system that will bring about another paradigm shift, to continuous modelling.

What is continuous modelling? Continuous modelling supports incremental changes to models as data becomes available, and because the development of the model is visible to the wider organisation, decisions can be made based on the latest data and the most current understanding.

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Modelling with the offset surface tool

By Jason McIntosh

Leapfrog has a new surface modelling tool available in the Geological modelling toolset! The offset surface tool will be available to users who have the latest version of Leapfrog Geo or Geothermal. It’s designed to enable a greater degree of flexibility when modelling complex stratified geology, particularly from heterogeneous data. The offset surface tool appropriates all the current dynamic functionality available in the existing geological modelling surface options.

So how can the new tool be used to model such deposits? Users of Geo 2.2.1 and earlier may already be familiar with the existing offset tool that was located in the meshes folder. The new tool incorporates much of the same functionality but supersedes the earlier version with improved algorithms and additional editing options. The new functionality is well suited for modelling faulted, stratified deposits.

Folded and faulted offset surface stratigraphy.

Folded and faulted offset surface stratigraphy.

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Building a geological model – Part 3 of 3

By Andrew Cantwell

Creating a first pass interpolant

This video continues on from part 2 of building a geological model in Leapfrog.

The process outlined in this video is simplified – the idea of this blog post is to give an understanding of the speed and ease of creating a first pass interpolant which can then be refined to give a more reasonable model.

You won’t hear any narration in this video but captions have been provided to explain the basic steps. If you’re after a more detailed description of the model building process then please contact your local support team.

We recommend you view this video in full screen mode. It may take approximately 30 seconds after you press play to switch to High Definition (given your internet connection allows it).

The main steps in this video include:

  • Viewing the assay data
  • Using some of the visualisation options to gain a basic understanding of the trend
  • Creating an interpolant model
  • Adjusting some basic parameters to get a more realistic model.

If you missed the previous videos in the model building series you can view Part 1 or Part 2 on this blog.

 

Further reading:
Case Study – can implicit modelling be used to model complex geology.

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Building a geological model – Part 2 of 3

By Andrew Cantwell

This video continues on from part 1 of building a geological model in Leapfrog.

You won’t hear any narration in this video but captions have been provided to explain the basic steps. If you’re after a more detailed description of the model building process then please contact your local support team.

We recommend you view this video in full screen mode. It may take approximately 30 seconds after you press play to switch to High Definition (given your internet connection allows it)

The main steps in this video on building a geological model include:

  • How to create a new geological model
  • Creating depositional surfaces
  • Editing a surface using a polyline
  • Activating surfaces to produce volumes
  • Creating dykes
  • Editing interval selections
  • Adjusting the chronological order of the surfaces
  • Creating intrusions

If you missed part 1 you can view the post here

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Making a scene – Leapfrog Saved Scene

By Sam Bain

Imagine you have built an amazing geological model. You have identified and fixed the problems in the core logging, you have reconciled the lithology labels used by the different historical surveys of the area, your geological surfaces are consistent with the data and make geological sense, your grade model has been built taking into account the geological structures and you are happy with its predictions. Is that your job done? No, of course not.

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Predictions at locations where there are no measurements

By Richard Lane

A key feature problem in geological modelling is how to take scattered measurements and use these to make predictions at locations where there are no measurements. The data may be measurements on the surface, or samples taken from drilling, or channel samples taken while excavating. Figure 1 shows the basic problem. Solving this problem is fundamental to how Leapfrog software works, and it underpins the geological and mineralization models that are produced.

Figure 1: A simple scattered data problem. Estimate the value at the red cross from the blue samples.

Figure 1: A simple scattered data problem. Estimate the value at the red cross from the blue samples.

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Interpolation and anisotropy

By Kirk Spragg

Introduction

In addition to interpolation, Leapfrog provides two tools that give the user control over the continuity of grade in their interpolants. These are the “Global Trend” and the more advanced “Structural Trend”.

The Global Trend can be effectively used to alter the results of an interpolant.  The Global Trend  is suitable to use in situations where the underlying geology implies that grade is continuous in a planar direction over large distances. If this is not the case, and the underlying geology implies that direction of grade continuity varies over space, then Leapfrog’s Structural Trend is a more appropriate tool to use when modelling your deposit or ore body.

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