Tag: ARANZ Geo

Modelling with the offset surface tool

By Jason McIntosh

Leapfrog has a new surface modelling tool available in the Geological modelling toolset! The offset surface tool will be available to users who have the latest version of Leapfrog Geo or Geothermal. It’s designed to enable a greater degree of flexibility when modelling complex stratified geology, particularly from heterogeneous data. The offset surface tool appropriates all the current dynamic functionality available in the existing geological modelling surface options.

So how can the new tool be used to model such deposits? Users of Geo 2.2.1 and earlier may already be familiar with the existing offset tool that was located in the meshes folder. The new tool incorporates much of the same functionality but supersedes the earlier version with improved algorithms and additional editing options. The new functionality is well suited for modelling faulted, stratified deposits.

Folded and faulted offset surface stratigraphy.

Folded and faulted offset surface stratigraphy.

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Making the most of Leapfrog for flow modelling: Part 2

By Jason McIntosh

Continued from part 1 – Making the most of Leapfrog for Flow Modelling.

Generate and evaluate a finite element grid

Finally to generate a FEFLOW model right click ‘Flow Models’ in the project tree and select ‘New 2D FEFLOW Model’. Set the element size and boundary from either a GIS line, polyline or a GM. Next expand the grid, right click ‘grid’ and select ‘New feature’. Within the dialogue add any ‘Point’, ‘Line’ or ‘Polygon’ features you wish to refine the grid with. Select ‘Simplify Feature’ to reduce or increase the number of points used for the boundary prisms. Next double click the grid, in the ‘Features’ tab and activate any features you wish to build detail around and the number of refinement steps. Within the ‘Boundary’ tab select either a rectangular boundary or a custom boundary by selecting ‘From another object’.

2D FEFLOW grid with refined cells about the collar locations.

2D FEFLOW grid with refined cells about the collar locations.

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The Leapfrog Team

This is the final history blog in a six part series – The Leapfrog Team. If you missed part five, Gaining Acceptance, you can find it here.

Many of the original development team still work for ARANZ Geo, all adding their substantial knowledge and experience to the mix.  Many joined as students in the early days to advance the RBF mathematics and software that is Leapfrog’s engine, FastRBF™.  ARANZ Geo founder, Rick Fright describes it as a ‘blend of expertise’ and a ‘combination of experts all at the top of their game’, many in between working at University College London or Cambridge University. Fundamentally the common theme was that they were Kiwi’s, many friends from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand.

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Gaining acceptance

This is the fifth history blog in a six part series. If you missed part four, Leapfrog’s Fast RBF™, you can find it here.

In 2004, following successful testing and use of the initial product by SRK Consulting, ARANZ Geo was formed to begin the marketing and further development of the product to the mining industry. Leapfrog Mining was born.

Too fast!

But in the early days Leapfrog® struggled to be accepted. Says Rick Fright, “People didn’t take it seriously because it was just too fast!  And it was too isotropic, it didn’t take into account folding strata.”

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Leapfrog’s Fast RBF™

This is the fourth history blog in a six part series – Leapfrog’s fast RBF. If you missed part three, Modelling in full 3D, you can find it here.

In 1999 work began on new surfacing algorithms so that an RBF implicit model could be utilised by conventional computer graphics packages. This meant converting an implicit RBF model into meshes of triangles and piecewise continuous spline surfaces.

The main difference between traditional RBF’s and what became ARANZ’s FastRBF™ is the ability to deal with large datasets of well over 1,000,000 points on ordinary computing hardware incredibly quickly. The maths used to speed up the calculation was initially used in particle physics. Filtering and approximation methods make Fast RBF™ ideal for visualising and processing non-uniformly sampled noisy data. FastRBF™ has extraordinary extrapolation capabilities, even when large gaps occur in a data set.

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Modelling in full 3D

This is the third history blog in a six part series – Modelling in full 3D. If you missed part two, Medicine, movies and outer space!, you can find it here.

In 1996 in pursuit of more mathematically robust meshes ARANZ rekindled their close collaboration with mathematician Rick Beatson. This motivated the extension of his fast RBF methods to modelling full 3D data and a new way of describing the surfaces of objects implicitly using a ‘signed-distance’ function.

Says ARANZ Geo founder Rick Fright, “Having got the scanner working, and gathered scattered point measurements from the surface of a 3D object, we realised we had an even bigger problem of reconstructing a complete and continuous surface model. So we got back in touch with Rick Beatson.”

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Medicine, movies and outer space!

Leapfrog in Medicine, Movies and Outer Space

This is the second history blog in a six part series. If you missed part one, In the beginning, you can find it here.

In 1995, the success of the 3D ultrasound and laser scanning research prompted Rick Fright to start Applied Research Associates Ltd (ARANZ) along with friend and former fellow student Bruce McCallum (Electrical Eng.), Mark Nixon (medical doctor) and Brent Price (from Med Physics). Together they hit on the idea of a hand-held portable laser scanner, which allowed almost any solid object’s surface to be acquired and represented, initially, as a mesh of triangles.

A hand-held portable laser scanner being used on a troll model for Lord of the Rings.

A hand-held portable laser scanner being used on a troll model for Lord of the Rings.

These meshes were adequate for many applications, including the movie industry, where the scanner was very successful in computer animation and utilised in numerous films from the Lord of the Rings trilogy to the Star Wars prequels.

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Using Leapfrog Geo in unconventional ways

By Scott Briscoe

We are pleased to publish another guest blog this week! Scott Briscoe is a geologist who has worked in both exploration and mining roles in Nevada, California, Alaska and Western Australia.  He is a professional geologist currently doing exploration in Nevada.  His specialties include mapping, advanced geological modeling, leading teams, identifying and solving problems in the pursuit of finding ore. You can read more of his articles on his own blog Briscoe Geology. Below is the process Scott went through to visualize his earthquake data, using Leapfrog Geo.

 

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